Glacier National Park Photography Overview

On October 30, 2016, in Montana, by admin

location-map

(click to enlarge)

Here is a map view of my photography locations during a the summer trip to Glacier National Park.  Each orange box with numbers shows a location and the number of images taken there.  The map is a screen capture from the Map Module in Adobe Lightroom.  I used a Bad Elf GPS Tracker to log my location throughout the trip.  I then merged the saved tracks form the GPS tracker with the images in Lightroom.

Here are the locations and the images, starting from the “8” on theft side of the map:

“8” – Polebridge Mercantile.  Inside the mercantile are some knick knacks and bakery items of photographic interest.

“5” and “6” on Lake McDonald.  Some good vista images of the lake and surrounding hills.

“20” and “27” are Logan Pass Visitor Center and Hidden Lake Overlook.  Lots of landscapes and fields of flowers during the walk to the overlook.

“14” is a stop along the Going to to the Sun Road before the Logan’s Pass Visitor Center.  Several waterfalls and scenic vistas in this area

“18” is a stop along the Going to to the Sun Road past the Logan’s Pass Visitor Center.  More waterfalls and scenic vistas in this area

The blank square is a single image at a waterfall at the top of Saint Mary Lake

“161” is the Lost Goose Island overlook.  This is the iconic image for Glacier National Park.  I spent several hours there from well before sunrise until about 0900.  Still have a LOT of images to review and delete.

“31” is a waterfall beside the Many Glacier Hotel

Not shown are a lot of images taken from one of the tour boats on Saint Mary Lake.  I forgot to start my GPS tracker that day.

With the exception of the Hidden Lake Overlook, all of the images were taken within 100 yards of the main road.  I was with a non-hiker and only had a few days in the park, so I did not wander to any of the more remote photography locations.

 

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Abandoned Truck, Bannack State Park Photography

On October 21, 2016, in Montana, by admin
An abandoned truck at Montana's Bannack State Park

Abandoned truck at Montana’s Bannack State Park

Well, this might be the last post featuring an image from Bannack State Park.  Given the relatively short amount of time I spent in the town, I am impressed with the number of quality images.  I spent about two hours photographing the main town and another 40 minutes or so in the cemetery.  After processing, I ended up with six solid images.  I could easily spend an entire day, and well into the evening, at the park.

The lack of color in the park makes for strong black and white images.  The various shades of brown of the dry vegetation and the weathered buildings make the conversion to black and white nicely.  I used Google’s Silver Efex Pro to make the conversion to black and white.  Silver Efex Pro is a great plug-in when used with Photoshop Creative Cloud.  A few mouse clicks and some slider tweaks result in very nice black and white images.  I have read several magazine articles and web tutorials on making the black and white conversion using Photoshop layers.  Just my opinion, but none of they work as well as Silver Efex Pro, especially given the free price!

Abandoned Truck, Bannack State Park: N 45°9’43”  W 112°59’47”

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Abandoned Outhouse, Bannack State Park, Montana

Abandoned Outhouse, Bannack State Park, Montana

Here is an abandoned outhouse on the north side of the street at Bannack State Park.  Given the rattlesnake warning signs in the area, I had no desire to go any closer!

Besides the interior and exterior of the old buildings, Bannack State Park offers lots of free standing objects (a truck, outhouses, and ore carts among others) for photography.  Include these objects in a wide panorama, or get close in for the detailed texture and patterns.  Whichever way you prefer to photograph, there is a lot of photography to be done at Montana’s Bannack State Park.

Abandoned Outhouse: N 45°9’40”  W 112°59’37”

 

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